A tribute to Monisha Datta


When I was growing up in New Delhi, Mona didi was always the cool, big sister — the better half of the “MonoTony” of neighbouring families. She introduced me to the wonderful world of FRIENDS, cold coffees and Nirula’s Hot Chocolate Fudge.

She was the Monica of our block — her clothes neatly stacked; her room spic and span. Mom used to take one look at my sloppy cupboard and mutter in frustration — “Why can’t you be more like her?” Monisha was the daughter she never had.

Mona didi was fearless. When a grumpy neighbour was kicking week-old stray puppies, she screamed at him until he gave up and ran inside. She tended to their injuries and took them to the animal shelter.

When I had nothing to wear for a college function, she drove me to Ebony to pick out a dapper jacket. I still have it, although now it will be tough to wear it without thinking of her.

She was a perfectionist in whatever she did. When not modelling and winning beauty pageants (putting her near 6-foot frame to good use), she found time to earn a university medal in geography, take a summer course in German and roam the world. Still, New Delhi was always her favourite city.

Then she married and moved away to Bangalore and our jobs took their toll. Our phone conversations dwindled to the bare minimum of get-well-soons and hurried birthday wishes. It was her rakhis that always arrived in the mail on the one day she never forgot, no matter how busy she was.

What I am angry about is she departed for heaven without as much as a goodbye, failing to conquer a teensy-weensy monster called dengue. The Mona didi I knew had been so strong her whole life; this virus should have been no match for her.

I picture her chuckling up above in the clouds where she will be making herself useful, delivering knockout punches to demons and taking over as CEO of the guardian angel club.

No, she doesn’t need tears. She was happiest when others smiled. And she would rather you remember her by watching a FRIENDS episode. The one where they sing “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” was one of her favourites.

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5 Responses to A tribute to Monisha Datta

  1. Anonymous says:

    She was one of the sweetest person to talk to, full of energy and a loving person/sister. I am going to miss her a lot………….Still remeber the days abd time we spent togehter in Delhi, those Family gettogetherwe had at your place on the terrace and at our place………we all were a closed family………..We all are going to miss her………..May God bless her soul.LoveDeepak

  2. Anonymous says:

    I miss you didi, Miss u so much. How I wish our summer vacations in Jammu come back. With all of us together again having the midnight cafe and playing cards with gossips. Whenever I will be back to India, my eyes will still search for you.I can never forget so much love and so much care you have always shared. You are the big sis and the best of friends always.RegardsRidhi

  3. RIP Monisha… We will remember you always, If there is next life then I would like to be your Bro, can't stop my eyes :((GOD BLESSHemanth

  4. Vivek Verma says:

    This is a message for the family of monisha datta, if it can be communicated to them. I feel sorry for the demise. But it was a poetic end to this multi-faced personality, at last.

    Vivek Verma
    X-husband

  5. Anonymous says:

    Mona ! Truly , I can see you up there in the clouds punching the demons and as CEO of the Angels Club…looking down upon all those whom you love and showering flowers of your love on each one of them.

    BE Blessed!
    Winky

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